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SURCON 2021 - Coatings for a brighter future

SURCON 2021 - Coatings for a brighter future
The Oil & Colour Chemists’ Association invites you to register for SURCON 2021.

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Date: Wednesday 3 & Thursday 4 November 2021

Time: 09:00 – 17:00

Venue: Online Zoom Webinar

The Oil & Colour Chemists’ Association invites you to register for SURCON 2021.

OCCA’s mission is to promote links between academia and the coatings industry to support technical and scientific discoveries, create innovative products and encourage talented students to take advantage of the diverse prospects for employment that are available in this sector. It is this interaction that has enabled the industry to achieve technical and commercial success in the past and will support the development of new solutions to future challenges.

SURCON 2021 provides a forum for researchers, engineers and technologists from academia, government laboratories and industry to present their findings, exchange ideas and share insights. OCCA has a proven track record of bringing academics and industry R&D professionals together and SURCON 2021 is no exception. The conference will provide an opportunity to showcase innovative science & technologies related to surface science and surface coatings, including paints, inks, adhesives and sealants.

In view of the ongoing situation regarding the Covid-19 pandemic, and in a change to previous announcements, OCCA’s Technical Committee have taken the decision to run SURCON 2021 as an online event only, rather than the proposed hybrid event which was due to have taken place at Media City, Salford.

The event will include a full two-day programme comprising four sessions led by a keynote speaker. Delegates have the option of registering for the full programme, or either Day 1 or Day 2, to suit themselves. Delegates will also receive a link enabling access to recordings of all relevant sessions after the event.

SESSION 1 – Sustainability and the Environment
Wednesday morning, 3 November 2021

Sustainability, in its many guises, is arguably the most important driver confronting the coatings industry. Paint and ink manufacturers are developing and, in some cases, are already supplying products to support their customers with ever-increasing sustainable content, because of growing public demand for more sustainable products and increased product recyclability.

The session will be led by keynote speaker, Tom Bowtell (BCF), who will discuss 'Sustainability in the Coatings Industry - solutions to creating a circular economy', followed by presentations by:

  • Dr. Matthias Pfeiffer (BASF), ‘New plasticizers based on alternative raw materials’.
  • Dr. Bart Noordover (allnex), ‘Isocyanate-free, fast-drying primer/topcoat systems‘.
  • Tony Heslop (BASF), ‘The impossible bottle – a case study in making paper hold liquid using formulated dispersion technology’.
  • Dr. Yolande Cordeaux and Dr. Lukas Schertel (University of Cambridge/Impossible Materials), 'Sustainable colours inspired by nature'.

SESSION 2 – Sustainability and the Environment
Wednesday afternoon, 3 November 2021

Health, safety and environmental concerns have been an omnipresent issue in coatings development for decades with the emergence of VOC legislation and replacement of lead, to the more recent Chemicals Management regulations, such as REACH and TSCA, to protect workers and consumers. The last two years have, however, refocused attention on antimicrobial coatings and their performance, and brought a new category of coating, antiviral coatings, under the spotlight.

Keynote speaker Peter Askew (IMSL UK), a recognised expert in the field of test methodology for assessing the efficacy of antimicrobial coatings, will discuss ‘Antimicrobial coatings: Possibilities and limitations’.

This will be followed by Dr. James Redfern (Manchester Metropolitan University) on ‘How do we determine the efficacy of an antimicrobial surface?’

Other session papers include:

  • Xavier Franc (Synthron), ‘Polymeric flow and levelling agents for water-borne coatings’.
  • Dr. Romain Severac (Angus Chemical), ‘Improving indoor air quality with amino alcohols’.

SESSION 3 – Colour
Thursday morning, 4 November 2021

Colour is a topic close to OCCA’s heart. It is an essential, ever-present component of paints and inks. As such, there is a long history of colourant development, colour measurement and our understanding of colour perception. Keynote speaker Prof. Long Lin (University of Leeds) will attempt to answer some of life’s more important colour questions with the aid of work undertaken over the last thirty years in a presentation entitled: ‘Colour and colourants: Perception, creation, application and quantification’.

Other speakers in this session will address new developments in colour measurement and titanium dioxide optimisation, including:

  • Matthew Adby (X-Rite), Cloud colour formulation & quality, what advantages can an AWS architecture provide?
  • Henrik Folkerts (BYK Gardner), ‘Lighting up the darkness of BLACK. Quantifying jetness with a new spectrophotometer’.
  • Andy White (FP Pigments), ‘Improvements in TiO₂ optimisation through the incorporation of air voids in TiO₂/CaCO₃ composite pigments’.

Like other areas of the coatings industry, there are also sustainability concerns in the colourants industry. Ad van Oorschot (Black Bear) will consider the ‘Latest advances of recovered carbon blacks in paints, coatings, plastics and inks’.

SESSION 4 – Green Chemistry
Thursday afternoon, 4 November 2021

The drive towards more sustainable coatings is reliant on the availability of raw materials from renewable resources and being able to substitute fossil fuel-based components. This involves identifying a suitable renewable resource (that will not compromise food resources) and using microbial and/or chemistry processes to obtain a valuable intermediate or constituent for pigments/dyes, resins and other coating components.

This session will include presentations addressing new technology developments in each of these areas, including:

  • Dr. Rob McElroy (University of York), ‘Sustainable solvents and mesoporous materials in surface chemistry’.
  • Jonathan Lane (NXT Levvel), ‘Potential for levulinates as coalescing agents’.
  • Durgesh Kumar Soni (Harcourt Butler Technical University), ‘Some important steps in isocyanate free route for synthesis of polyurethanes’.
  • Prof. Doris Vollmer/Dr. William Wong (Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research).

SURCON 2021 Full Programme

DAY 1: 3 November 2021

09:20 – 09:35 Opening Remarks: Paul Sheppard OCCA
Session 1: Sustainability and The Environment OCCA
09:35 – 10:10 Key Note Speaker: Tom Bowtell
Sustainability in the Coatings Industry – solutions to creating a circular economy ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Whilst big strides have been made in the past 25 years to reduce VOCs in coatings, reduce solvent and energy use in manufacturing and improve recycling rates, in many cases with zero waste to landfill, one major challenge still faces the industry. 55 million litres of decorative paint sold each year are leftover, yet only 2% of this is recycled, reused or remanufactured. Tom will explain how the British Coatings Federation, through its PaintCare initiative, are aiming to revolutionise the treatment of leftover paint, aiming for 75% of leftover paint to be reused, remanufactured or recycled, creating hundreds of jobs in paint remanufacturing and new markets for remanufactured paint, creating a true circular economy for leftover decorative paint.

Bio:
Tom joined the British Coatings Federation as their Chief Executive Officer in 2012. Previously he was the General Manager and Director of Proskills UK, a Sector Skills Council. Tom has extensive experience of the Paint Industry, having worked for AkzoNobel for 19 years in the Vehicle Refinish and Decorative Coatings Sectors in the UK, The Netherlands, Eastern Europe and the USA in senior sales and marketing roles. Tom has a BA business degree from Bournemouth University. He is married with three children, a keen cyclist, ageing footballer and passionate Chelsea supporter.
Chair: NC
10:10 – 10:45 Paper 2: BASF: Dr Matthias Pfeiffer
New plasticizers based on alternative raw materials ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
BASF’s Biomass Balance approach contributes to the use of renewable raw materials in its integrated production system. In this process, renewable resources, such as bio-naphtha or bio-methane derived from organic waste or vegetable oils, are used as feedstock at the very beginning of the production network (Verbund) and are allocated to the respective sales products using a third party verified mass balance approach. The certified products thus contribute to sustainable development by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and saving fossil resources.
The resulting products which carry the name suffix “BMB” have the exact same properties as those manufactured from fossil feedstock. Our customers can therefore further process them in the same way as conventionally manufactured products and use them in demanding applications.

Bio:

Dr. Matthias Pfeiffer obtained a Diploma in Chemistry 1997 at the University of Würzburg and finished his PH.D. in Inorganic Chemistry 1999.

Until 2008 he worked for Jungbunzlauer, focusing on the Application Technology and Market Development of Citric acid ester and other natural fruit acid ester as plasticizers for PVC and other polymers.

In 2008 he joined BASF SE in Ludwigshafen and had several positions in Marketing and Development for Glues, Impregnating resins and metal injection molding. 2014 Matthias came back to the “PVC and Plasticizer World” and took over the responsibility for the Technical Marketing of the European BASF plasticizer portfolio.

Since 2020 he is also Vice chair of European Plasticzers, (the trade association that represents chemical companies producing 85% of the plasticizers manufactured in Europe) and member of the VinylPlus Stering Board.

Chair: NC
10:45 – 11:00 BREAK
11:00 – 11:35 Paper 3: Allnex: Dr Bart Noordover
Isocyanate-free, fast-drying primer/topcoat systems ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
The advancement of fast drying, isocyanate-free topcoat systems based on Real Michael Addition (RMA) chemistry triggers the need for fast drying primers with an excellent performance profile. Compositions based on ketimine- and acetoacetate-functional binders were designed showing excellent drying performance at room temperature, facilitating short overcoat windows while maintaining an acceptable potlife. Outstanding substrate and intercoat adhesion as well as flexibility were achieved in combination with RMA topcoats. These novel primer/topcoat systems, having an advantageous HSE profile compared to common 2K epoxy / PU systems, also offer a significant potential for use of biobased raw materials. In this talk, the chemistry, resin design (incl. biobased prototypes) and performance of the binders will be discussed in detail.

Bio:
Bart Noordover is a Chemical Engineer and holds a PhD degree from the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) on polymer chemistry and coatings science. He worked for the Dow Chemical Company and was an Assistant Professor at TU/e. In 2015, he joined allnex and is currently lab and project leader, focussing a.o. on isocyanate-free coating technologies. He has (co-)authored over 60 scientific publications and patent applications.
Chair: NC
11:35 – 12:10 Paper 4: BASF: Tony Heslop & Vicky Callaghan
The impossible bottle – a case study in making paper hold liquid using formulated dispersion technology ABSTRACT & BIO

Abstract:
The materials used in the production of bottles come with compromises. Glass is heavy and needs a lot of energy to produce and recycle. Plastic is lightweight and much lower energy to produce but stays in the environment for a long time if not disposed of properly. When the global drinks brand owner Diageo set about a quest to find an alternative, they came to BASF to solve the problem of how to make paper hold liquid. This presentation showcases how custom formulated spray applied coatings were used to create a barrier to a wide diversity of both food and non-food liquids across a range of FMCG categories while remaining recyclable through normal paper waste streams.

Bio:
A polymer chemist by education, Tony Heslop spent the first 15 years of his career in the coatings industry working first in R&D and then moving into sales of pigments and additives with Ciba. After the acquisition of Ciba by BASF, he moved into their dispersions business before becoming market development manager for the UK/Ireland. For the past four years, as Senior Sustainability Manager, he has been focussed upon translating BASFs sustainability strategy into local action and helping customers and colleagues meet their sustainability targets.

Vikki Callaghan is a chemist with application experience in the polymer industry, she has 28 years of technical sales experience and now has a market development role within BASF focusing on the sustainability and circularity of the packaging industry value chain


Chair: NC
12:10 – 12:45 Paper 5: Univ of Cambridge Impossible Materials: Dr Lukas Schertel
Sustainable colours inspired by nature ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Structuring material at the scale of the wavelength of light to control light–matter interactions is essential for the fabrication of next-generation paints and coatings. Nature can serve as a source of inspiration for structured materials but also as a primary source of biomaterials. Fibrillar cellulose can mimic natural optimized scattering systems such as the network structure found in the Cyphochilus beetle. Its lightweight, 5μm thin scales serve as nature's strongest scattering material, creating the brightest white on the smallest scale. We develop brilliantly white pigments from cellulose, as an alternative to titanium dioxide the most widely used white pigment. Regulators in Europe are banning the use of TiO2 in health sensitive segments forcing a shift towards sustainable alternatives.

Bio:
After his PhD in physics (University of Zurich), Lukas joined the Bio-inspired photonics group (Chemistry Department, University of Cambridge), working on sustainable photonic pigments. Since 2020 Lukas focuses on spinning out the startup company 'Impossible Materials', with the aim to commercialize cellulose-based white pigments as an alternative to titanium dioxide.

Chair: NC
12:45 – 13:30 LUNCH
Session 2: Healthy Environment OCCA
13:30 – 14:05 Key Note Speaker: Peter Askew
Antimicrobial Coatings Possibilities and Limitations ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Coatings with antimicrobial properties have long existed, but their activity was limited to protecting films from defacement and deterioration by biological growth. In some instances such coatings have been employed where growth of fungi could impact on the hygiene of an area in which it was deployed. The idea of extending this functionality to create self-disinfecting surfaces that can not only prevent growth, but actively kill microorganisms when they come into contact with the coated surface is attractive. Such coatings could clearly be useful in clinical situations and may even be able to play a role in preventing hospital-acquired infections etc. However, moving from aspiration to delivering a benefit is complex and difficult and demonstrating functionality can be equally so.

Bio:
Peter Askew has been working as a microbiologist since 1977. For the first 2 years he worked in the food industry before joining the microbial ecotoxicology unit of ICI’s agrochemicals business. In 1988 he joined ICI’s surface coatings division as company microbiologist and became more focused on the microbiolgy of materials and industrial processes both for this and other divisions of ICI. In 1996 he left ICI to form IMSL to pursue this further as an independent commercial enterprise. IMSL is a specialised microbiological testing and consultancy service based in laboratories and offices near Fleet in the UK. Work is confined to materials and industrial systems (eg coatings, adhesives, plastics, textiles, spin finishes, paper and disinfectants). No standard food and water testing is undertaken. IMSL is highly active in the development of testing methodologies for the determination of the performance of treated articles especially with regards to supporting claims made for them at a regulatory level. Peter is a member of all of the major microbiological societies and is Vice President of the International Biodeterioration Research Group and is the chairman of its Treated Articles work group. He is a member of a number of national and international standards committees related to antimicrobial performance as well as several industry think tanks. As well as qualifications in microbiology, he is an Associate of the Oil and Colour Chemists Association and is the consultant to the OECD on treated articles.
Chair: AME
14:05 – 14:40 Paper 7: MMU: Dr James Redfern
How do we determine the efficacy of an antimicrobial surface? ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Surfaces that confer antimicrobial activity continue to gain popularity. For some surfaces the antimicrobial action can only occur when wet. Therefore, the drying rate of a microbial contaminant is an important factor in confirming the antimicrobial potential of a surface. There are many factors which are likely to alter the rate at which even water dries: temperature, relative humidity (RH), air flow, inoculum size, composition of the inoculum (e.g. microorganisms) and surface properties (e.g. hydrophobic). Data demonstrates humidity, inoculum size, inoculum composition and surface material have a complex relationship relating to drying time and microbial survival. It is essential these effects are properly understood and considered when designing new test methods for antimicrobial materials.

Bio:
Dr James Redfern is a microbiologist and academic in the Department of Natural Science, Manchester Metropolitan University. His research interest include developing test methods for antimicrobial material testing (planktonic and biofilm) that can model environmental conditions expected in end-use environments.
Chair: AME
14:40 – 14:55 BREAK
14:55 – 15:30 Paper 8: Synthron:  Xavier Franc
Polymeric flow and levelling agents for water-borne coatings ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Whether it is about decorative paints or industrial coatings, waterborne finishes need to achieve a perfect surface appearance and optimal mechanical properties. During the drying of waterborne coatings, some irregularities or textures can develop on the surface, resulting in coating defects such as craters, orange-peel, pinholes and de-wetting effects. Perfect flow, levelling and substrate wetting are the key to achieving perfect surface appearance. These properties are directly related to control of the surface tension at both the liquid-air and liquid-substrate interfaces. Avoiding negative side-effects such as loss of inter-coat adhesion and stabilisation of foam is also an important goal. A new series of VOC-free surfactant-like polymeric additives combining flow, levelling and substrate wetting are a significant help for the paint formulator.

Bio:
After biochemical studies at Lyon’s Claude Bernard Sciences University, Xavier started his career in 1984 in an R&D laboratory in the cosmetic industry. After a few years he moved to the paints and coatings industry as Sales Manager for a producer of raw materials (resins, pigments and additives). In 1992 he joined a major additives producer as Technical Advisor and Business Development Manager. Since 2010 Xavier has worked at Synthron as Business Manager Additives for Coatings and Inks.
Chair: AME
15:30 – 16:05 Paper 9: Angus Chemical: Romain Severac
Improving Indoor Air Quality with Amino Alcohols ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Air pollution is one of the world’s largest environmental health risks. Moreover, the level of hazardous air pollutants can be five times higher in indoor air than outdoor air. Much of the pollution found indoors comes from VOCs emitted from carpets, furniture, electronics, household cleaners and other synthetic materials. Chronic exposure to these invisible toxins, such as formaldehyde, can create long-term health problems. Due to a multitude of formaldehyde sources commonly found within indoor environments, it is a significant challenge to address the emission of each source individually. Therefore, an attractive solution to reducing indoor formaldehyde levels is through a chemical remediation or scavenging system. One of the emerging trends for the effective removal of indoor air contaminants is the use of functional coatings. We demonstrate how the unique functionality of amino alcohols can help improve indoor air quality by providing high-efficiency formaldehyde scavenging performance when used in waterborne architectural paints. Amino alcohol additives are highly effective at low dosages and do not require major reformulation work, enabling the creation of functional coatings to improve indoor air quality.

Bio:
In early 2016, Romain Severac joined ANGUS Chemical company as Technology manager, dedicated to Coatings, Adhesives, Sealants and Inks in EMEA. After the implementation of a brand new laboratory in Paris, Romain is now in charge of both technical developments and renewal of the technical basis of ANGUS portfolio as Global paint and coating Technical Leader. Previously, Romain worked over 12 years as Technical leader at DuPont de Nemours for the fluorotelomer business. He graduated from Montpellier chemical high school in inorganic materials where he also completed an engineer degree in polymers materials, and received a doctorate in polymer synthesis.
Chair: AME
16:05 – 16:15 Day 1 Summary OCCA

DAY 2: 4 November 2021

09:30 – 09:40 Opening Remarks: Paul Sheppard OCCA
Session 3 : Colour OCCA
09:40 – 10:15 Key Note Speaker:  Prof Long Lin
Colour and Colourants: Perception, Creation, Application and Quantification ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
What is colour? Was colour there at the beginning of the ‘world’ on earth? Why can black and white also be regarded as colours? Why is the understanding of living being’s perception of colour and instrument-based quantification of colour important? What are the natures and the human’s ways of creating colourants? What are the essential properties of commercially feasible colourants? This talk will attempt to take the audience through a journey of discovering answers to these questions and more, with the aid of practically meaningful examples accumulated through research and development studies over the last three decades.

Bio:
Long is the Professor of Colour and Polymer Science, the Head of Department of Colour Science, one of the founding Directors of the DP Centre of Industrial Collaboration, and the Colour and Textile Science Centre, at Leeds University, UK. He is the Editor-in-Chief of China Coatings Journal (SinoStar Intl., HK) and Pigment and Resin Technology - The International Journal of Colorants, Polymers and Colour Applications (Emerald Publications, UK). He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry; a Fellow of Technology of Surface Coatings; a Fellow of the Institute of Paper, Printing and Publication; a Chartered Chemist; and an Honorary Member of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers of the City of London. Long has spent the last 30 years collaborating with printing, coating, textile and related raw material industries and has completed a significant number of R&D projects for these industries. He has authored over 200 published papers/patents/confidential technical reports.
Chair: NC
10:15 – 10:45 Paper 11: XRite:  Matthew Adby
Cloud Colour Formulation & Quality, what advantages can an AWS architecture provide? ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
We will explore how cloud computing platforms can be architected to bring benefits to the colour and coatings market in terms of new capabilities, accessibility, speed, and sustainability. Stand-alone desktop, networked colour matching, or quality control systems are typically restricted by the performance of PC and the platform on which they are running. New developments using AWS can allow access through any connected PC, tablet, etc. and provide instantly expandable computing power through multi-threading, enabling advanced effect color matching that was not feasible and too slow on standalone PC’s. Serverless architectures also provide future proofing as they can expand to fit your needs, offer ease of deployment for new users and are centrally and continuously updateable.

Bio:
Joined X-Rite in 1998 with progression through Applications Support, Sales Account Management, Product Management, now responsible for Product Portfolio Management within the markets of Consumer Products & Materials, Retail, Appearance and Automotive Products. X-Rite manufacture, market and support innovative technology-based solutions for global markets where colour and appearance matter, from inspiration through production, for the purpose of creating economic value while considering our environmental and social responsibilities. My current role includes; Managing a team of product managers that help define market roadmaps, develop business models and strategic partnerships, working closely with our customers to validate product concepts. Prior to joining X-Rite I worked for 11 years in the paint industry, where I operated in architectural, protective and automotive sectors, holding R&D, Quality Control and Production Development roles.
Chair: NC
10:45 – 11:00 BREAK
11:00 – 11:35 Paper 12: BYK Gardner: Henrik Folkerts
Lighting up the darkness of BLACK.  Quantifying Jetness with a new spectrophotometer ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Carbon Black is a material with a long history whose production dates to the early civilizations of mankind. Initial uses can be traced back to ancient China, the early Egyptians, and India since the days before Christ. Today carbon black is found in all aspects of modern life. It has always been the greatest challenge for a spectrophotometer to achieve repeatable and reproducible results on a black colour. While a white sample reflects almost 100 percent of the light emitted by the spectrophotometer, the proportion of reflected light becomes smaller and smaller with darker colors - as increasingly larger amounts of light are absorbed by the sample. Consequently, the so-called "signal to noise ratio" changes with dark colors: The measurement signal decreases while the thermal noise, which is basically caused by electronic components, remains constant. Measurements of innovative, deepest black coatings with very low reflection takes place at a lightness value of L* < 1. This is a challenging task for a measurement instrument and pushes the technical performance of a handheld spectrophotometer to the utmost limit. The paper gives an overview and examples how to measure the most challenging colour - BLACK.

Bio:
Henrik Folkerts has been working for BYK-Gardner for 23 years. He focuses his activities on WEBseminars, customer trainings, internal trainings and workshops in the field of Colour, Gloss and Appearance measurement. He gives technical papers at various paint and colour association and societies.
Chair: NC
11:35 – 12:10 Paper 13: Black Bear: Ad van Oorschot
Latest advances of recovered carbon blacks in paints, coatings, plastics and inks ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
End of life tyre pyrolysis is not something new. Ever since the early 70’s people have been trying to produce good enough qualities pyrolysis oil and recovered carbon black to be able to sell them. Unfortunately, conditions under which it happened were so poor that most of these initiatives did not make it and the initiatives also contributed a lot to the bad reputation of recovered carbon black. Over the last years conditions changed a lot, and several companies produce reasonable to good qualities pyrolysis oil and recovered carbon black. Because of the environmental impact the interest among (potential) customers s also growing. Black Bear Carbon has proven their capabilities making high quality recovered carbon black and pyrolysis oil. Their recovered carbon blacks find not only customers in low end applications but also found their way into high end coatings applications such as powder coatings and (OEM) automotive applications as well as engineering plastics and some ink applications. Also, their pyrolysis oils find their way into high end applications such as virgin carbon black manufacturing and chemical recycling rather than in bunker or marine fuels. This presentation will highlight some of these high‐end applications for recovered carbon blacks as well as a preview on what future developments can and/or will be developed and bring in terms of applications.

Bio:
After finishing his chemical education (HBO/BSc) he started working as a R&D chemist and applications laboratory group leader. Later in his career he also finished an executive MBA in strategic marketing/general management. Getting in contact with customers and the market he decided to give his career a commercial twist and since then he has been working at the edges of sales, marketing and technical service, including a position at Cabot as technical service manager. In these positions he also gained a lot of international carbon black experience. He has been working for over 35 years in ink & coating related industries.
Chair: NC
12:10 – 12:45 Paper 14: FP Pigments: Andy White
Improvements in TiO₂ Optimisation through the incorporation of air voids in TiO₂/CaCO₃ composite pigments. ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
FP-Opacity Pigments™ have become an established and proven way to optimise TiO₂ use in matt paints without compromise to opacity and mechanical properties. The performance of the original composite pigments was based on the principle of maintaining the optimum distance between TiO₂ particles, thus improving the scatter per unit TiO₂. New advances in our technology have enabled us to increase the air void content of the composite pigment allowing further optimisation of High PVC Matt paint formulations, while maintaining or improving the level of scatter. This paper will show how the new composite performs compared to existing opacifiers providing cost effective opacity, quality and performance.

Bio:
After a degree in Chemistry from Nottingham University, Andy started work making polymers and subsequently industrial coatings for ICI in Birmingham in 1984. In 1991 he stepped into raw materials when he moved to SCM Chemicals (latterly Millennium Chemicals and now Cristal/Tronox) as a Technical Service Manager. There followed a 17 year career in TiO2, selling into both the coatings and plastics markets and ending up in some of their highest sales positions (Global Account Manager – Akzo, BASF, PPG). In 2007 Andy moved out of TiO2 into coloured pigments as European Sales Director for Rockwood Pigments (now Venator), moving on the Cathay Pigments as VP for Global Key accounts in 2013. In early 2017 Andy stepped back into the TiO2 sphere enticed by the next generation opacifying technology with FP Pigments and now heads up the Paints and Plastic Business Unit for Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia.
Chair: NC
12:45 – 13:30 LUNCH
Session 4: Green Chemistry OCCA
13:30 – 14:05 Key Note Speaker: Dr Rob McElroy
Sustainable solvents and mesoporous materials in surface chemistry ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
With a drive from both legislation and evolving attitudes, solvent selection has become an increasingly important area of research. The use of solvents in surface chemistry revolves around the need for dissolution and casting of complex systems, not a simple task. Mesoporous materials offer an advantage over more established systems such as activated carbon, both as a result of their pore size and surface chemistry. This can lead to interesting and improved properties in surface materials.

Bio:
Dr Rob McElroy gained his Ph.D in 2007 at Keele University working on the production of composite materials from copolymers incorporating renewable resources. In 2009 he joined Prof. Pietro Tundo’s Carbonate Chemistry Group at Ca Foscari University of Venice looking into applications of dialkyl carbonates. He joined the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York as a PDRA in 2011 and has worked on a variety of projects including extraction and separation in supercritical CO2, greening of pharmaceutical chemistry, production of bio-derived polymers, production of bio-derived surfactants and in running an industry facing club focusing on circular economy related research called RenewChem. His current role is looking at binder recovery and electrode formulation in lithium ion batteries as part of the R2LiB project.
Chair: AME
14:05 – 14:40 Paper 16: NXT Levvel: Jonathan Lane
Potential for Levulinates as coalescing agents ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Produced from agricultural waste, derivatives of levulinic acid such as butyl levulinate, ethylhexyl levulinate and isoamyl levulinate can be used as sustainable alternatives to materials such as 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate and dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether for water-based emulsions. Their limited water solubility assists in demonstrating a high level of effectiveness in lowering the MFFT as well as frequently enhancing properties of the film, notably the hardness. In many resin systems this technology improves the overall coalescing efficiency to the extent that reduced loadings are necessary to achieve the same performance. The demonstrated performance, along with the resultant lower use level, addresses the industry need to reach targeted cost-performance criteria with sustainable chemistry. Levulinates have an excellent HSE profile and contain up to 100% bio-based carbon, facilitating replacement of petrochemical coalescents. This presentation will provide an overview of the technology, application case studies, and environmental impacts.

Bio:
Jonathan began his career in the packaging sector before moving to the Polyurethane Systems division of Dow Chemical, and subsequently to head the Arrow Solutions speciality chemical business for Reabrook Ltd. With over 20 years experience in the chemical industry, he has led businesses in multiple countries delivering formulated product solutions for a wide range of applications. As Global Business Development Manager at NXTLEVVEL Biochem, Jonathan has made the move from petrochemicals to bio-based chemicals, with responsibility for developing the market for a new and exciting range of levulinic acid derivatives.
Chair: AME
14:40 – 14:55 BREAK
14:55 – 15:30 Paper 17: Harcourt Butler Tech Univ, Kanpur:  Durgesh Kumar Soni
Some Important steps in Isocyanate Free Route for Synthesis of Polyurethanes
ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Polyurethanes which are used in different segments of industries are produced conventionally by reaction of diisocyaates and polyols. This route uses toxic isocyantes, phosgene etc. which causes a serious health hazard and harm to the environment. An ecofriendly route for producing the same is by the reaction of cyclic carbonate groups with the diamines. The synthesis of cyclic carbonate groups is an important step in this route for polyurethanes. The species which contain epoxy group, when reacted with carbon dioxide in presence of a catalyst, cyclic carbonate groups are formed. In this paper the synthesis of glycidyl acrylate monomers, as an epoxy ring source has been discussed and some popular reactions for cyclocarbonates has also been presented.

Bio:
Durgesh Kumar Soni from Ballia in India is pursuing his doctorate in Paint Technology from Harcourt Butler Technical University, Kanpur under the guidance of Prof. P.K. Kamani and Prof. Arun Maithani. He has completed B.Tech (Hons.) in same stream from HBTI only. He Working on – Synthesis of Non Isocyanate Polyurethane Coatings.
Chair: AME
15:30 – 16.05 Paper 18: Max Planck Institute: Dr Doris Vollmer
Grafting silicone at room temperature - a transparent, scratch resistant, non-stick coating ABSTRACT & BIO
Abstract:
Silicones are colorless, non-toxic, and generally considered to be biocompatible materials. They are used in a wide range of technologies due to their versatile properties, including thermal stability, lubrication, and water repellency. Silicones are usually considered to be inert, and thus not reactive with surfaces. Here we show that the most common silicone, methyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane, spontaneously and stably bounds on glass – and any other material with silicon oxide surface chemistry – even at room temperature. As a result, a 2–5 nm thick and transparent coating, which shows extraordinary non-stick properties towards polar and non-polar liquids, ice, and even super glue, is formed. The mechanically stable coating can be easily applied by painting, spraying, or roll-coating. Notably, the reaction does not require any excess energy, solvents, nor does it induce hazardous by-products, which makes it an interesting option for environmentally sustainable surface modification.

Bio:
Soft matter science and wetting: My scientific background is in physical chemistry. For many years I investigated structural and thermodynamic transitions in microemulsions, polyelectrolytes and colloids. In particular, I wanted to understand the phase behavior and kinetics of phase separation. Since 2009 my research has been mainly concerned with fundamental and applied problems in the wetting behavior of structured surfaces, in particular of superhydrophobic, superamphiphobic and slippery surfaces. We introduced laser scanning confocal microscopy as a novel and extremely powerful tool to explore static and dynamic properties of (multicomponent) liquids on hydrophobic surfaces. We are combining synthesis of model-structures, analysis of microscopic and macroscopic features with complementary experimental techniques and modeling by mean-field descriptions.
Chair: AME
16:05 – 16:15 Closing Remarks: Paul Sheppard OCCA

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